Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard100 results found

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Dashboard Widgets : Amazing widgets for your Mac OS X dashboard

Your one-stop widget warehouse.  You will find thousands of widgets, most of them free. Play a game. Get a recipe. Check out the latest sports scores. The sky is the limit.

Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 17

Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 17 delivers improved security, reliability, and compatibility by updating Java SE 6 to 1.6.0_65. This update enables per-website control of the Java plug-in within Safari 5.1.9 or later. Please quit any web browsers and Java applications before installing this update. See http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5946 for more details about this update. See http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1222 for information about the security content of this update. Keep your software up to date. If you need Java, download the latest version of Java for OS X directly from Oracle https://www.java.com

About the security content of Java for Mac OS X 10.6 Update 2

Java CVE-ID: CVE-2009-1105, CVE-2009-3555, CVE-2009-3910, CVE-2010-0082, CVE-2010-0084, CVE-2010-0085, CVE-2010-0087, CVE-2010-0088, CVE-2010-0089, CVE-2010-0090, CVE-2010-0091, CVE-2010-0092, CVE-2010-0093, CVE-2010-0094, CVE-2010-0095, CVE-2010-0837, CVE-2010-0838, CVE-2010-0840, CVE-2010-0841, CVE-2010-0842, CVE-2010-0843, CVE-2010-0844, CVE-2010-0846, CVE-2010-0847, CVE-2010-0848, CVE-2010-0849, CVE-2010-0886, CVE-2010-0887 Available for: Mac OS X v10.6.3, Mac OS X Server v10.6.3 Impact: Multiple vulnerabilities in Java 1.6.0_17 Description: Multiple vulnerabilities exist in Java 1.6.0_17, the most serious of which may allow an untrusted Java applet to execute arbitrary code outside the Java sandbox. Visiting a web page containing a maliciously crafted untrusted Java applet may lead to arbitrary code execution with the privileges of the current user. These issues are addressed by updating to Java version 1.6.0_20. Further information is available via the Sun Java website at http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/releasenotes-136954.html Java CVE-ID: CVE-2010-0538 Available for: Mac OS X v10.6.3, Mac OS X Server v10.6.3 Impact: Visiting a web page containing a maliciously crafted untrusted Java applet may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution with the privileges of the current user Description: An out of bounds memory access issue exists in the handling of mediaLibImage objects. Visiting a web page containing a maliciously crafted untrusted Java applet may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution with the privileges of the current user. This issue is addressed by preventing Java applets from using the com.sun.medialib.mlib package. This issue only affects the Mac OS X implementation of Java. Credit to Marc Schoenefeld of University of Bamberg for reporting this issue. Java CVE-ID: CVE-2010-0539 Available for: Mac OS X v10.6.3, Mac OS X Server v10.6.3 Impact: Visiting a web page containing a maliciously crafted untrusted Java applet may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution with the privileges of the current user Description: A signedness issue exists in the handling of window drawing. Visiting a web page containing a maliciously crafted untrusted Java applet may lead to an unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution with the privileges of the current user. This issue is addressed through improved bounds checking. This issue only affects the Mac OS X implementation of Java. Credit to Jonathan Bringhurst of Northrop Grumman, and Jeffrey Czerniak for reporting this issue.

Mac OS X 10.6 and earlier: Hiding or showing a window's toolbar

Many Mac OS X application windows such as Mail, Pages, and Numbers, as well as Finder windows, include a toolbar that can be hidden or shown by clicking the Toolbar button in the upper right corner of the window in Mac OS   X   10.6 and earlier. On the top right of a toolbar is the Toolbar button (looks like a gray oval).   If you click this button once, the toolbar icons will collapse and become hidden. Clicking this button again will show the toolbar icons.  You can also choose Show Toolbar from the View menu.

Mac OS X v10.5, v10.6: About named streams on SMB-mounted NAS, Mac OS X, and Windows servers; "-36" or "-50" alerts may appear

Named streams are used to store Mac OS X extended attributes and can be leveraged to avoid using AppleDouble files to store the data fork and the resource fork of legacy Mac files. Mac OS X Server v10.5 and v10.6 , as well as many Network Attached Storage (NAS) devices, support named streams when you connect to them via SMB. Microsoft Windows servers with NTFS-formatted hard drives also support named streams when you connect to them via SMB; named streams are called "Alternate Data Streams" in Windows. Mac OS X v10.5 and v10.6 clients automatically enable named streams support when they have a SMB connection to a Mac OS X Server v10.5 or v10.6 -based server. Mac OS X v10.6 clients automatically enable named streams over SMB when the NAS or Windows server claims to support it.  See below for details about how to activate Mac OS X v10.5 client support of named streams over SMB connections to a NAS or Windows server. You can enable named streams in three different ways, as described below.

Mac OS X v10.7: Unable to connect to a Mac OS X v10.6 Open Directory Server

This can happen if Lion uses Authenticated Binding to a Mac OS   X   v10.6 Open Directory Server that is also bound to Active Directory by means of a magic triangle.

About the security content of Mac OS X v10.6.7 and Security Update 2011-001

This document describes the security content of Mac OS X v10.6.7 and Security Update 2011-001, which can be downloaded and installed via Software Update preferences, or from Apple Downloads. For the protection of our customers, Apple does not disclose, discuss, or confirm security issues until a full investigation has occurred and any necessary patches or releases are available. To learn more about Apple Product Security, see the Apple Product Security website. For information about the Apple Product Security PGP Key, see "How to use the Apple Product Security PGP Key." Where possible, CVE IDs are used to reference the vulnerabilities for further information. To learn about other Security Updates, see "Apple Security Updates."

Mac OS X v10.5, 10.6: About the Parental Controls Internet content filter

You can use Parental Controls in Mac OS X 10.5 and 10.6 to help prevent user accounts from accessing inappropriate content on Internet websites. This article describes how this feature works. The Internet content filter is built into the core of the operating system, allowing it to filter Internet access regardless of which Web browser is used. To enable Internet content filtering:  From the Apple menu, choose System Preferences. From the View menu, choose Parental Controls. Select the user account on the left side of the window that you would like to enable filtering for. Note: Parental Controls cannot be enabled for administrator accounts (admin accounts will not appear in the window). Check Accounts preferences in System Preferences to see which account(s) have what level of access (Admin, Managed, and so forth). Click "Enable Parental Controls". Click the Content tab. Chose one of the three modes under Website Restrictions. See below for a description of each. Repeat steps 3 through 6 for other non-administrator accounts for which you would like to enable filtering.   About Internet content filter's three modes The Internet content filter can operate in three modes: unrestricted, automatic, and whitelist. "Allow unrestricted access to websites" (unrestricted) When "Allow unrestricted access to websites" is selected, the Internet content filter logs websites that the account visits but does not restrict Web browsing. Visited websites are still logged and can be examined in the Logs tab of Parental Controls preferences.   "Try to limit access to adult websites automatically" (automatic) When "Try to limit access to adult websites automatically" is selected, the Internet content filter does its best to block websites with inappropriate content. To do this, the Internet content filter uses the same technology that the Mail application uses to identify "junk" mail. The Internet content filter can identify, with a high degree of accuracy, whether a Web page is safe or not by examining various properties of the website including text and structure. Additionally, the Internet content filter will block a website if the website identifies itself as adult-oriented using RTA (http://www.rtalabel.org/) or SafeSurf (http://www.safesurf.com/ssplan.htm) rating systems, as well as forcing "safe" searches with some search engines. In this mode, the Internet content filter logs all visited and blocked websites, and flags them as such in the Logs tab of Parental Controls preferences. In certain situations, the automatic Internet content filter may mistakenly block a safe website or allow an adult-oriented website. For example, if the website uses an uncommon language or if there is very little text on the page. These websites can be identified in the Log tab of the Parental Controls preference pane and added to the "Always Allow" or the "Never Allow" lists. These lists can also be accessed by clicking the Customize… button in the Content tab of Parental Controls preferences. Websites that are mistakenly blocked can also be allowed by clicking the "Allow…" button on the blocked web page and authenticating as an administrator user. https note: For websites that use SSL encryption (the URL will usually begin with https), the Internet content filter is unable to examine the encrypted content of the page. For this reason, encrypted websites must be explicitly allowed using the Always Allow list. Encrypted websites that are not on the Always Allow list will be blocked by the automatic Internet content filter.   "Allow access to only these websites" (whitelist) If "Allow access to only these websites" is selected in Parental Controls, the Internet content filter blocks any website which is not on the list. When the blocking web page is presented, a list of allowed websites is also shown. If using Safari, allowed websites are displayed as bookmarks in the bookmarks bar. Note: For most websites, the Internet content filter considers the domain name and not the path. For example, if http://www.example.com is added to the list, then http://pictures.example.com will be allowed, as will http://www.example.com/movies. In whitelist mode, visited and blocked websites are flagged in the Logs tab of Parental Controls preferences and can be added or removed from the whitelist there.

Mac OS X v10.5, 10.6: Finder label changes to files/folders mounted via SMB may not appear to other clients

This can happen if some clients use Mac OS   X v10.6 and some use Mac OS   X v10.5. One workaround is to use named streams for both Mac OS   X  v10.5 and 10.6 . There are three ways to do that: To enable named streams for Mac clients on a per-SMB mount point basis Mount the NAS device or Microsoft Windows server on your Mac via SMB. Note: A NAS is used in the below command examples. Execute this Terminal command: ls /Volumes Note the proper mount name for your shared NAS. Execute this command in Terminal (replace SharedNAS with the proper mount name of your shared NAS): touch "/Volumes/SharedNAS/.com.apple.smb.streams.on" Eject the NAS or Windows server by dragging it to the Trash. Mount the NAS or Windows server again. Named streams will be active. If you have legacy AppleDouble files, execute this command in Terminal to convert them before using them: dot_clean --keep=dotbar "/Volumes/Shared NAS" Important: Once converted, all Mac clients accessing this data will have to have named streams enabled. To enable named streams as a default for your Mac OS X client's user account   Execute these two commands in Terminal: echo "[default]" >>  ~/Library/Preferences/nsmb.conf echo "streams=yes" >> ~/Library/Preferences/nsmb.conf   To enable named streams as a default for all Mac OS X client user accounts on a Mac Log in to Mac OS X with an admin account if you aren't already, then execute these two commands in Terminal: echo "[default]" | sudo tee -a /etc/nsmb.conf echo "streams=yes" | sudo tee -a /etc/nsmb.conf

Java for Mac OS x 10.6 update 17

My mac says I need update Java for Mac OS x 10.6 update 17, but it won't let me download it, as it says it cannot be found on the server.  Do I need a new operating system for my Mac, if so which one?

Mac OS X v10.5 or 10.6: Renaming or saving after using "Apply to enclosed items" on a home folder

You can use the "Apply to enclosed items" feature to change permissions on items inside folders you've created. You should avoid using this feature on folders included with OS X , like your home folder. Changing permissions on your home folder can cause the following issues to happen in OS X   Leopard and Snow Leopard : When moving items within your Home (such as from your desktop to your Documents folder), a prompt for an administrator's user name and password may appear. You may be unable to rename files or folders. When renaming an item you see the message, "You do not have sufficient access privileges to rename the item (file or folder name)." Alert messages may appear when attempting to save files like, "(filename) could not be removed because you do not have appropriate access privileges. You do not have appropriate access privileges to save file (name) in folder (name)." If you've changed the permissions on your home folder in OS X Leopard or Snow Leopard , you can use the following steps to correct the issue. If you're experiencing similar symptoms in OS X Lion, see this article instead.  Log in as the affected user account. Open Terminal (located in /Applications/Utilities). Type this command followed by Return: sudo chmod -RN ~ Note: The character after "-RN" is a tilde (~). If the affected user has no account password, using  sudo will not work.     Enter an administrator name when prompted. Next restart the computer using your Leopard or Snow Leopard installation DVD (insert the disc, restart, then hold the C key as the computer starts up). Choose Reset Password from the Utilities menu in the Installer. Select your startup drive in the window that appears. Select the affected user from the user account pop-up menu. Click the Reset button in the "Reset Home Directory Permissions and ACLs" section. Quit the Reset Password application. Quit the Installer. Start up from your normal OS X startup disk (not the installation DVD). Note: Using these steps removes any custom access rights set for items in the home folder of the user you selected.

Mac OS X v10.4, 10.5, 10.6: How to look up ".local" hostnames via both Bonjour and standard DNS

The Multicast DNS feature of Bonjour allows devices on a local network to connect to each other without a separate DNS server by using the ".local" domain, as described in this article. This advanced article explains how to make your Mac look up host names ending in ".local" using both Multicast DNS and standard Unicast DNS using the name servers specified in the Network pane of System Preferences. Some private networks also use ".local" domains for hosts registered with their internal DNS server, even though it is not a valid top-level domain on the public Internet. If your Mac is connected to such a network, you may want it to look up host names that end in ".local" by using Unicast DNS to speak to a DNS server, the same way that it looks up host names such as "www.apple.com" on the Internet. Mac OS X v10.6 In Mac OS X v10.6 , as long as your network's DNS server is properly configured, you do not have to make any changes on your client Mac. Host names that contain only one label in addition to local, for example "My-Computer.local", are resolved using Multicast DNS (Bonjour) by default. Host names that contain two or more labels in addition to local, for example "server.domain.local", are resolved using a DNS server by default. Additionally, Mac OS X v10.6 automatically detects when the local network operator has set up a name server that will answer name requests for a domain ending in ".local". It does this by checking to see if there is a Start Of Authority (SOA) record for the top level domain "local", which is how a DNS server indicates that it claims to have authority over a part of the DNS namespace. As long as the DNS server is properly configured with the required SOA record, Mac OS X v10.6 will detect this SOA record and automatically use this server to look up all host names in the domain. Mac OS X v10.5 In Mac OS X v10.5, host names that contain only one label in addition to local, for example "My-Computer.local", are resolved using Multicast DNS (Bonjour) by default. Host names that contain two or more labels in addition to local, for example "server.domain.local", are resolved using a DNS server by default. To use Unicast DNS to look up names like "My-Computer.local", add local to the list of search domains in the Network pane of System Preferences. For Ethernet interfaces, add local to the text box labeled "Search Domains", using a comma to separate it from any other search domain names. For other network interfaces, such as AirPort, click the Advanced button, select the DNS tab, click the + button under the Search Domains list, and add local. If you have multiple entries in this field, be sure that local is first, and separate them with commas. For example: local, apple.com Mac OS X v10.4 In Mac OS X v10.4, all host names that end in ".local" are resolved using Multicast DNS (Bonjour) by default. To use Unicast DNS to look up ".local" names, add local to the list of search domains in the Network pane of System Preferences. Select the desired network interface and click Configure. Add local to the Search Domains field. If you have multiple entries in this field, be sure that local is first, and separate them with commas. For example: local, apple.com

System requirements for OS X Lion and Mac OS X v10.6

To use Lion, make sure your computer has the following: An Intel Core 2 Duo, Core i3, Core i5, Core i7, or Xeon processor Mac OS X v10.6.6 or later to install via the Mac App Store (v10.6.8 recommended) 7 GB of available disk space 2 GB of RAM If your Mac does not meet these requirements, you will need to upgrade your Mac before installing Lion. For more information, see OS X Lion - Technical Specifications.

About the security content of OS X Lion v10.7.2 and Security Update 2011-006

This document describes the security content of OS X Lion v10.7.2 and Security Update 2011-006, which can be downloaded and installed via Software Update preferences, or from Apple Downloads. For the protection of our customers, Apple does not disclose, discuss, or confirm security issues until a full investigation has occurred and any necessary patches or releases are available. To learn more about Apple Product Security, see the Apple Product Security website. For information about the Apple Product Security PGP Key, see "How to use the Apple Product Security PGP Key." Where possible, CVE IDs are used to reference the vulnerabilities for further information. To learn about other Security Updates, see "Apple Security Updates".  

HP Printer Drivers v2.16.1 for Mac OS X v10.6 Snow Leopard

This download includes HP printing and scanning software for Mac OS X v10.6 Snow Leopard . For information about supported printer models, see: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT6198

HT201232 My operating system is Mac OS X 10.6.8 and when I'm surfing the web, it tells me I need to update my browser however when I check for updates, nothing comes up. What do I need to do to get Mac OS X Lion v10.7?

My operating system is Mac OS X 10.6.8 and when I'm surfing the web, it tells me I need to update my browser however when I check for updates, nothing comes up. What do I need to do to get Mac OS X Lion v10.7?

Running Mac OS X version 10.7.5.  Websites are telling me that Safari browser needs to be updated.  How do I update Safari?  Choosing Apple, Software Updates does not update either the Mac OS X version or Safari.  TY

Mac Pro OS X , version 10.7.5 Trying to update Safari browser. Websites that I have long used are sending messages that Safari browser version is no longer supported.  Some sites I can get to.  Other sites show that browser is unsupported version. How can Safari be updated?  Thank you

Mac OS X v10.6 Snow Leopard - Technical Specifications

Mac OS X: Mac OS Extended format (HFS Plus) volume and file limits

Volume and file limits in Mac OS X Maximum number of volumes (all Mac OS X versions) no limit Maximum number of files (or files and folders) in a folder (all Mac OS X versions) up to 2.1 billion (2) Maximum volume size and file size ( Mac OS X v10.0 - 10.1.5) 2 TB (1) Maximum volume size and file size ( Mac OS X v10.2 - 10.2.8) 8 TB (1) Maximum volume size and file size ( Mac OS X v10.3 - 10.5.2) 16 TB (1) Maximum volume size and file size ( Mac OS X v10.5.3 or later) close to 8 EB (1,3) Notes The theoretical maximum file size for a Mac OS Extended file system is millions of terabytes. In practice, the maximum file size is equivalent to the maximum volume size, except for a small amount of disk space reserved for file system information. Specifically, 2^31, or 2,147,483,648. However, the actual number of files that can be stored on a Mac OS Extended (HFS Plus) or journaled HFS+ volume depends on the volume's size and the size of the files. For example, a 160 GB Mac OS Extended volume with the default block size of 4 KB has 40 million available blocks. This volume could store up to 40 million very small files, but not 2 billion. A bigger disk with the same default block size could hold proportionately more files. 2^63 - 2^31 = 9,223,372,034,707,292,160, which is just under 8 exabytes (EB). One exabyte is roughly equivalent to one million terabytes.

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