87W USB-C Power Adapter

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  • Overview

    The 87W USB-C Power Adapter offers fast, efficient charging at home, in the office or on the go. While this power adapter is compatible with any USB-C–enabled device, Apple recommends pairing it with your 15-inch MacBook Pro with Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports for optimal charging performance.

    Charging cable sold separately.

    What’s in the Box

    Apple 87W USB-C Power Adapter

    Tech Specs

    USB-C

  • Mac Models

  • 2.0 Average
    2 out of 5 stars
    Number of stars Percentage Number of reviews
    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      Poor design choices + nickel and diming = unhappy customer

      As a longtime Apple enthusiast, I tend to go easy on Apple when it comes to controversial design decisions. However, this is getting out of hand. 1) Apple dropp As a longtime Apple enthusiast, I tend to go easy on Apple when it comes to controversial design decisions. However, this is getting out of hand. 1) Apple dropped all cable management for this new adapter design. This time around, there are no fold out clips to wrap the cable around the adapter and there is no clip on the cable itself to facilitate wrapping it up. I have to use a black Velcro strap every time I'm done using it and want to securely stow it in my bag, which is exactly the opposite of the simple yet functional design aesthetic I thought Apple strived for. 2) There is no charging indicator / status light on the new AC Adapters. As a result, I have to log in to the laptop and check the battery meter to monitor progress. 3) There is no reasonable justification for charging $79 for an "extra" AC adapter AND forcing me to pay another $19 for the required charging cable that used to be included (and permanently affixed) to previous iterations of Apple AC adapters. That's right folks, for $79 you get only the power brick, the charging cable (seems like an obvious requirement) that runs between the brick and the laptop is NOT included! Once you throw that in, you're looking at almost $100 to keep a backup power cord in your laptop bag. Apple somehow managed to ruin every single aspect of what used to be an elegant design. Best of all, they charge more for the privilege of using it.

      • Written by Eric S from Penfield

      2194 of 2336 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?Poor design choices + nickel and diming = unhappy customer

    • 2.0 out of 5 stars

      Too bulky and too overpriced

      This thing works but it's really ridiculous that you need to spend 80 dollars on a power adapter that doesn't even include the charging cable. Also, since the L This thing works but it's really ridiculous that you need to spend 80 dollars on a power adapter that doesn't even include the charging cable. Also, since the LED indicator is gone as well there is no way to know if your laptop is charging unless you heard the sound it makes when you plug it in. Overall, its really not the best but its what you need to power your device.

      • Written by Ori M from El Sobrante

      1329 of 1435 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?Too bulky and too overpriced

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      As if all the dongles weren't enough

      Not including a simple 2 meter USB C cable with an $80 charger is beyond stupid. It's almost as if they have contempt for their own customers. This is nickel Not including a simple 2 meter USB C cable with an $80 charger is beyond stupid. It's almost as if they have contempt for their own customers. This is nickel and diming at it's worst.

      • Written by IT R from Reston

      759 of 805 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?As if all the dongles weren't enough

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      worthless - they last 3 months at the most

      Do yourself a favor. buy two - you'll need it. Sadly the non-apple ones are also worthless so you have to get the brand ones. Worthless. Sigh

      • Written by Tori H from Asheville

      Is this review useful?worthless - they last 3 months at the most

    • 2.0 out of 5 stars

      Does not come charge cable!!!!!

      I drove an hour to buy this from the apple store assuming it came with a charging cable LIKE THE 50 OTHER APPLE POWER ADAPTERS I HAVE PURCHASED IN THE LAST 20 Y I drove an hour to buy this from the apple store assuming it came with a charging cable LIKE THE 50 OTHER APPLE POWER ADAPTERS I HAVE PURCHASED IN THE LAST 20 YEARS!! only to have to drive an hour back to get the cable and get back to work. Steve Jobs is rolling over in his grave.

      • Written by Jason G from Truckee

      Is this review useful?Does not come charge cable!!!!!

    • 5.0 out of 5 stars

      87W is great-way more than the 61W I had

      I just purchased the 87W power adapter for my MacBook Pro. Yes, it's a bit pricy but I think the extra power is very worthwhile-it will charge quite a bit fast I just purchased the 87W power adapter for my MacBook Pro. Yes, it's a bit pricy but I think the extra power is very worthwhile-it will charge quite a bit faster. I had previously purchased and used two way cheaper generics off of Amazon and they both failed after about a month-so much for that plan. My laptop came with the 61W adapter which is okay; however, if the day comes when it fails I realized I would need a backup immediately so I bit the bullet and bought the better adapter. Now my 61W is the backup in case I need it. And Apple's warranties are way better than the products I purchased off of Amazon-their silence is deafening-my emails are ignored.

      • Written by Christy C from STOCKTON

      1 of 1 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?87W is great-way more than the 61W I had

  • Answers from the community

    • Answer

      At least for mine: UL, not CSA.
      It's an A1719 (Delta Electronics ITE PSU 4T18), sold in the UK, and At least for mine: UL, not CSA.
      It's an A1719 (Delta Electronics ITE PSU 4T18), sold in the UK, and is marked with safety certifications as follows:-

      UL Japan (DENAN PS E)
      AS/NZS 4417 RCM (Australia/NZ)
      Nemko N-Mark (Norway)
      SafetyMark (Singapore)
      UL Listed (C-UL USA/Canada)
      CE (Europe)

      There is also a VI mark in a circle; I'm pretty sure this will be the DoE Level 6 power efficiency compliance label; however, the VI are in a seriffed font; I kinda thought they were meant to be sans-serif?

      Actually, I just found a suitably geeky teardown, complete with image of the certifications, but I cannot post the URL.
      Search the web for: chargerlab a1719 teardown review
      Then search in page for: certifications.

      Good luck!

      • Answered by James H from London
      • on Sep. 22, 2019
    • What is the output Amps for this product
      • Asked by Dhanasekar R from Ashburn
      • on Aug. 6, 2019

      Answer

      This is a nuanced issue. To answer as directly as makes sense ...

      Charger A1719 should comply wit This is a nuanced issue. To answer as directly as makes sense ...

      Charger A1719 should comply with the USB PD 2.0 standard's power rules.

      It delivers up to (nominally):

      2.4A @ +5.2v DC
      3.0A @ +9v DC
      The charger does not list +15v
      4.3A @ +22.2v DC

      (3rd-party testing suggests it can somewhat exceed these nominals - check out the ChargerLab.com teardown/review).

      So: for a PD (see below) device, max current varies by voltage, by negotiation, to a max of about 4.3A. That's more than a standard USB C cable's rating (3A) - use the correct cable!

      BUT ...

      For a non-PD device, the above tells you little about achievable current or power:

      There are many standards for 2 devices to negotiate & transfer power over USB.
      PD (Power Delivery) is just the latest series of standards.
      It supports multi-voltage.* It has been through 3 versions; this charger talks the second of them.
      Earlier standards than PD were mostly 5v only.
      There were several proprietary fast-charge 'standards'.

      Don't expect this charger to speak any of those other fast-charge standards.
      This will only deliver voltage above 5v by PD negotiation.
      Don't expect to get high currents at 5v to benefit non-PD devices; it doesn't work like that; max current on 5v hasn't really gone up very much in several years, and probably never will. At 5v, it probably won't even yield 2.4A without negotiation (2A is the starting point for negotiation).

      So if the device under charge does support USB PD, max current is in the chart above. Cables should be specced to 5A for max delivery.
      If it doesn't support PD, realisable charge currents will be much lower; maybe 1.5A @ 5v (7.5W) for a USB BC 1.2 compliant device; 2 to 2.5A@5v (10-12W) for something more recent.

      * Recall: Power (W) = Potential (V) x Current (A).
      Higher powers require higher voltages; you can't just keep increasing current at 5v - you'll burn out the cables (87W@5v needs 18A!!!)

      • Answered by James H from London
      • on Sep. 22, 2019