Inclusion & Diversity

Open.

Humanity is plural, not singular. The best way the world works is everybody in. Nobody out.

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A few updates we’d like to share.

Diverse teams make innovation possible.

Our female representation is steadily increasing, and we’re proud of the progress we’re making. For example, 36 percent of our employees under 30 are women. That’s an increase of 5 percentage points since 2014.

Women at Apple

  • 30%
  • 31%
  • 32%
  • 32%
  • 31%
  • 33%
  • 35%
  • 36%

If we want a product to appeal to and work for a big group of people, it needs to be built by a diverse group of people.

We depend on the contributions from our outstanding women leaders.

Twenty-nine percent of our leaders are women, reflecting a 1 percentage point increase from July 2016 to July 2017. And during that same period of time, the percentage of leaders under 30 who are women has increased by 3 percentage points. So our future generation of leaders includes an even greater percentage of women. Today 39 percent of our leaders under 30 are women.

29% of leaders at Apple are women
39% of our leaders under 30 are women

I’m passionate about welcoming more women into the tech industry. And thrilled they consider me a role model.

My biggest responsibility is hiring. Because who we hire today is our culture tomorrow.

We’re proud to support and welcome Veterans.

Through their experiences and backgrounds, they bring leadership, technical skills, and a spirit of collaboration to Apple.

We believe a welcoming community is important not just for Veterans, but for all our employees. So we created Diversity Network Associations (DNAs), which are communities centered around shared interests and beliefs. The Apple Veterans Association welcomes those who have served, their families, and any employee who wants to support and learn more about the military. It also helps Veterans with their transition to the workforce.

In the military, everyone works together to get things done. And it’s the same way here at Apple.

The culture at Apple allows me to be who I am and celebrate who I am.

LGBTQ rights are human rights.

People should not be discriminated against because of their sexual orientation or gender identity.

We’re honored to be rated one of the Best Places to Work for LGBTQ Equality by the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) and to have received a perfect score on its Corporate Equality Index for 15 consecutive years.

In 2017, we dedicated a portion of the proceeds from our Pride Edition Apple Watch band to help support the work of GLSEN, PFLAG, The Trevor Project, and ILGA.

And we use our voice to advocate for LGBTQ rights and freedom around the world.

15 years perfect score on HRC’s Corporate Equality Index

I’ve gotten a lot from Apple. And I want to give something back.

We’re not afraid to adapt and change to become more welcoming. I think we walk the talk here. We don’t just say we embrace diversity and inclusion. We do it.

The most powerful technology should be accessible to everyone.

It’s one of our core beliefs. And it’s the reason we design our products for everyone, including individuals with disabilities. So everyone has the opportunity to create, work, and play.

I’m completely blind, so my first experience with a product is holding it, not seeing it. Right away I start asking ‘Is this accessible? Could I use it?’

A more diverse future begins with opportunities in education.

We have always believed education is the great equalizer. And we’re dedicated to empowering students and educators at all levels.

Apple is the sole lifetime partner to the National Center for Women & Information Technology, which works to increase the meaningful participation of women in the field of technology.

Through our partnership with Historically Black Colleges and Universities, we welcomed our second class of Thurgood Marshall College Fund scholars to Apple in summer 2017. We look forward to welcoming our third class next summer.

We’re proud to be a part of ConnectED, a multiyear initiative bringing hardware and software, professional support, and infrastructure upgrades to underserved schools. We’ve made a $100 million commitment to 114 schools across the country to bring the latest technology into the classroom.

Coding is the language of the future. And everyone should have the opportunity to learn it. That’s why we’ve created free curricula for students from kindergarten through college. And because students at community colleges are the most diverse groups among higher education institutions, we’ve also introduced a free year-long app development curriculum for high school and community college students to help bring their ideas to life.

Opportunities like the Apple Scholars program level out the playing field because it puts Historically Black Colleges and Universities on the map to be included in the hiring of diverse talent.

Here’s data from the last four years.

Global gender

32%
68%

U.S. race and ethnicity

21%
9%
13%
3%
1%
n/a%
54%

The population of employees whose race or ethnicity was undeclared decreased from 6 percent in 2015 to less than 1 percent in 2016 and continues to remain below 1 percent in 2017. This decrease came as a result of stronger internal processes and employees properly identifying themselves. Because the majority of our previously undeclared employees identified as White, the decrease had no impact on the representation rates for any other group. Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Data as of July 2017.

The population of employees whose race or ethnicity is undeclared this year is less than 1 percent. This decrease comes as the result of stronger internal processes and employees properly identifying themselves. Because the majority of our previously undeclared employees identified as White, the decrease had no impact on the representation rates for any other group. Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Data as of June 2016.

Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Data as of June 2015.

Other includes Native American and Native Hawaiian & Other Pacific Islander. Gender data as of August 2014. Race and ethnicity data as of June 2014.

Our most recently filed Federal Employer Information Report EEO-1, representing employees as of July 2016, is available for download below. Due to changes in EEO reporting requirements, our next EEO-1 report will be filed in March 2018. We make the document publicly available, but it’s not how we measure our progress. The EEO-1 has not kept pace with changes in industry or the American workforce over the past half century. We believe the information we report elsewhere on this site is a far more accurate reflection of our progress toward diversity.