87W USB-C Power Adapter

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  • Overview

    The 87W USB-C Power Adapter offers fast, efficient charging at home, in the office, or on the go. While this power adapter is compatible with any USB-C–enabled device, Apple recommends pairing it with your 15-inch MacBook Pro with Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports for optimal charging performance.

    Charging cable sold separately.

    What’s in the Box

    Apple 87W USB-C Power Adapter

    Tech Specs

    USB-C

  • Mac Models

  • 1.5 Average
    1 out of 5 stars
    Number of stars Percentage Number of reviews
    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      Poor design choices + nickel and diming = unhappy customer

      As a longtime Apple enthusiast, I tend to go easy on Apple when it comes to controversial design decisions. However, this is getting out of hand. 1) Apple dropp As a longtime Apple enthusiast, I tend to go easy on Apple when it comes to controversial design decisions. However, this is getting out of hand. 1) Apple dropped all cable management for this new adapter design. This time around, there are no fold out clips to wrap the cable around the adapter and there is no clip on the cable itself to facilitate wrapping it up. I have to use a black Velcro strap every time I'm done using it and want to securely stow it in my bag, which is exactly the opposite of the simple yet functional design aesthetic I thought Apple strived for. 2) There is no charging indicator / status light on the new AC Adapters. As a result, I have to log in to the laptop and check the battery meter to monitor progress. 3) There is no reasonable justification for charging $79 for an "extra" AC adapter AND forcing me to pay another $19 for the required charging cable that used to be included (and permanently affixed) to previous iterations of Apple AC adapters. That's right folks, for $79 you get only the power brick, the charging cable (seems like an obvious requirement) that runs between the brick and the laptop is NOT included! Once you throw that in, you're looking at almost $100 to keep a backup power cord in your laptop bag. Apple somehow managed to ruin every single aspect of what used to be an elegant design. Best of all, they charge more for the privilege of using it.

      • Written by Eric S from Penfield

      2148 of 2285 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?Poor design choices + nickel and diming = unhappy customer

    • 2.0 out of 5 stars

      Too bulky and too overpriced

      This thing works but it's really ridiculous that you need to spend 80 dollars on a power adapter that doesn't even include the charging cable. Also, since the L This thing works but it's really ridiculous that you need to spend 80 dollars on a power adapter that doesn't even include the charging cable. Also, since the LED indicator is gone as well there is no way to know if your laptop is charging unless you heard the sound it makes when you plug it in. Overall, its really not the best but its what you need to power your device.

      • Written by Ori M from El Sobrante

      1302 of 1403 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?Too bulky and too overpriced

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      As if all the dongles weren't enough

      Not including a simple 2 meter USB C cable with an $80 charger is beyond stupid. It's almost as if they have contempt for their own customers. This is nickel Not including a simple 2 meter USB C cable with an $80 charger is beyond stupid. It's almost as if they have contempt for their own customers. This is nickel and diming at it's worst.

      • Written by IT R from Reston

      727 of 768 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?As if all the dongles weren't enough

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      Where is the innovation?

      I fully understand the need for slimmer and smaller when it comes to Macbooks but why could this charger not be designed to incorporate the benefits of the Mags I fully understand the need for slimmer and smaller when it comes to Macbooks but why could this charger not be designed to incorporate the benefits of the Magsafe 1 and 2?y Half the time, the charger slides out a few mm's guess what... no power. This needs updating to incorporate a magnet. With less technology than a 10-year-old Magsafe 1, this is extremely overpriced

      • Written by Leroy H from London

      Is this review useful?Where is the innovation?

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      All These 1 STAR Reviews are CORRECT

      Toast after 5 months.... already replacing this accessory. APPLE - shame on you!

      • Written by patricia D from Johns Creek

      24 of 26 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?All These 1 STAR Reviews are CORRECT

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      Bulky-overpriced

      Mac Pro 15" does not stay charged for long- adaptor is clunky heavy and angle of port attachment site creates an angle in cord that leads to excessive wear and Mac Pro 15" does not stay charged for long- adaptor is clunky heavy and angle of port attachment site creates an angle in cord that leads to excessive wear and tear. Challenge in plugging in to wall outlet due to heavy weight and is a huge space hog on an outlet.

      • Written by Viki R from Chicago

      28 of 29 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?Bulky-overpriced

  • Answers from the community

    • What is the output Amps for this product
      • Asked by Dhanasekar R from Ashburn
      • on 6 Aug 2019

      Answer

      This is a nuanced issue. To answer as directly as makes sense ...

      Charger A1719 should comply wit This is a nuanced issue. To answer as directly as makes sense ...

      Charger A1719 should comply with the USB PD 2.0 standard's power rules.

      It delivers up to (nominally):

      2.4A @ +5.2v DC
      3.0A @ +9v DC
      The charger does not list +15v
      4.3A @ +22.2v DC

      (3rd-party testing suggests it can somewhat exceed these nominals - check out the ChargerLab.com teardown/review).

      So: for a PD (see below) device, max current varies by voltage, by negotiation, to a max of about 4.3A. That's more than a standard USB C cable's rating (3A) - use the correct cable!

      BUT ...

      For a non-PD device, the above tells you little about achievable current or power:

      There are many standards for 2 devices to negotiate & transfer power over USB.
      PD (Power Delivery) is just the latest series of standards.
      It supports multi-voltage.* It has been through 3 versions; this charger talks the second of them.
      Earlier standards than PD were mostly 5v only.
      There were several proprietary fast-charge 'standards'.

      Don't expect this charger to speak any of those other fast-charge standards.
      This will only deliver voltage above 5v by PD negotiation.
      Don't expect to get high currents at 5v to benefit non-PD devices; it doesn't work like that; max current on 5v hasn't really gone up very much in several years, and probably never will. At 5v, it probably won't even yield 2.4A without negotiation (2A is the starting point for negotiation).

      So if the device under charge does support USB PD, max current is in the chart above. Cables should be specced to 5A for max delivery.
      If it doesn't support PD, realisable charge currents will be much lower; maybe 1.5A @ 5v (7.5W) for a USB BC 1.2 compliant device; 2 to 2.5A@5v (10-12W) for something more recent.

      * Recall: Power (W) = Potential (V) x Current (A).
      Higher powers require higher voltages; you can't just keep increasing current at 5v - you'll burn out the cables (87W@5v needs 18A!!!)

      • Answered by James H from London
      • on 23 Sep 2019
    • Answer

      USB-C Power Delivery fast charging requires protocol negotiation, which is not likely to be supporte USB-C Power Delivery fast charging requires protocol negotiation, which is not likely to be supported by a spllitter.

      • Answered by Jansen N from East Gwillimbury
      • on 10 Sep 2019