4500 Watts? How does that work with the 20A circuit breakers in my house? The breaker should trip at 2400 Watts, shouldn't it?

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  • My answer was correct as I simply gave available information about the unit’s power supply which didn’t list power.

    Power measurements, measured in Watts; RMS, continuous and peak are all different measurements. The device has a peak power rating of 4500watts. Not continuous or RMS. Peak power calculations in AC circuits involves some trigonometry and several steps. I’d rather not get into it considering I would be wasting my time and probably everyone else’s as well. Let me just say the modified sine wave that makes up the signal being sent to a speaker has both positive and negative voltage so peak (positive) to peak (negative) voltage is twice that of the maximum amount of voltage the amplifier can produce times 2.
    Since the voltage measurement is doubled and power is calculated with I x V the maximum power is also doubled. The device does infact draw a lot of power at high volumes, but not more than 2400 Watts. Devialet does recommend you plug the device directly into the wall and not into a power strip shared with other devices.

    Giving your uninformed opinion of the speaker without actual data or experience is just spreading misinformation. Since I’ve not heard the speaker myself, yet, I’m not going to form an opinion, however, the reaction to the speaker on Unbox Therapy speaks volumes and that guy reviews tons of speakers. That review made me interested in the speaker, but until I hear the speaker I don’t be buying it.

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