87W USB-C Power Adapter

  • Overview

    The 87W USB-C Power Adapter offers fast, efficient charging at home, in the office or on the go. While this power adapter is compatible with any USB-C–enabled device, Apple recommends pairing it with your 15-inch MacBook Pro with Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports for optimal charging performance.

    Charging cable sold separately.

    What’s in the Box

    Apple 87W USB-C Power Adapter

    Tech Specs

    USB-C

  • Mac Models

  • 2.0 Average
    2 out of 5 stars
    Number of stars Percentage Number of reviews
    • 3.0 out of 5 stars

      Frustrating - sometimes my laptop isn't being charged while plugged in.

      What really frustrates me about this power adaptor is that i regularly find my MacBook Pro not charging despite the fact it's plugged in. When compared to th What really frustrates me about this power adaptor is that i regularly find my MacBook Pro not charging despite the fact it's plugged in. When compared to the old magsafe adaptors this is a huge step backwards. Essentially there are 2 issues with the new design. 1) unless the usb-c connection is properly seated in it's slot power doesn't get to the laptop. Furthermore when working with the laptop on my knee - e.g. while travelling the connector can become slightly dislodged, meaning that charing stops. 2) unlike the old power adapter the usb-c cable can be disconnected at the "power brick" end as well as the laptop end, giving 2 possible points of failure. By contrast. look at a lightning connector as an good example of a connector that doesn't have this problem. A lightning connector has indentations at each side so that the connector can gripped by an iPhone. By contrast a USB-C connector has smooth sides and no notch that can be used by the laptop to hold onto the cable and stop it sliding out accidentally. I appreciate there may be reasons why apple moved away from magsafe, in principle I don't mid that the new adapter isn't magsafe, but I do mind that I'm not always getting a full charge when available while travelling on business, leading to a loss of productivity and loss of earnings because of a poorly designed power connector.

      • Written by Brian D from Newtownards

      45 of 55 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?Frustrating - sometimes my laptop isn't being charged while plugged in.

    • 2.0 out of 5 stars

      weird behaviour with USB C charger

      Every so often i find plugging in the 87W charger to my MacBook pro or iPad pro does not start charging them (at first i thought my mac was at fault, but not so Every so often i find plugging in the 87W charger to my MacBook pro or iPad pro does not start charging them (at first i thought my mac was at fault, but not so as a separate usb c device also doesn't charge). disconnecting the charger from the wall and device, dismantling the plug part of the charger and the cable; swapping the cable end for end and reconnecting everything seems to get it going again. what's going on??!! this issue is now present even in the third charger I have bought.

      • Written by Prithvi S from Harwich

      25 of 27 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?weird behaviour with USB C charger

    • 4.0 out of 5 stars

      Quite lit but too expense

      Pretty litt but costs too much for a charger

      • Written by Harry S from Chelmsford

      30 of 46 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?Quite lit but too expense

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      Where is the innovation?

      I fully understand the need for slimmer and smaller when it comes to Macbooks but why could this charger not be designed to incorporate the benefits of the Mags I fully understand the need for slimmer and smaller when it comes to Macbooks but why could this charger not be designed to incorporate the benefits of the Magsafe 1 and 2?y Half the time, the charger slides out a few mm's guess what... no power. This needs updating to incorporate a magnet. With less technology than a 10-year-old Magsafe 1, this is extremely overpriced

      • Written by Leroy H from London

      Is this review useful?Where is the innovation?

    • 1.0 out of 5 stars

      So Useless and Frustrating Charger

      The charger just decides not to work and no matter what you do in terms of repositioning the charger or Swapping the cable etc will resolve the issue. I think The charger just decides not to work and no matter what you do in terms of repositioning the charger or Swapping the cable etc will resolve the issue. I think Apple must have a second look and replace this charger. This is making life difficult for some of us. I thought it was the initial charger and bought another one but the problem persist. Do something Apple!!!!!!

      • Written by Emmanuel Mac D from Newton

      10 of 12 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?So Useless and Frustrating Charger

    • 2.0 out of 5 stars

      weird behaviour with USB C charger

      Every so often i find plugging in the 87W charger to my MacBook pro or iPad pro does not start charging them (at first i thought my mac was at fault, but not so Every so often i find plugging in the 87W charger to my MacBook pro or iPad pro does not start charging them (at first i thought my mac was at fault, but not so as a separate usb c device also doesn't charge). disconnecting the charger from the wall and device, dismantling the plug part of the charger and the cable; swapping the cable end for end and reconnecting everything seems to get it going again. what's going on??!! this issue is now present even in the third charger I have bought.

      • Written by Prithvi S from Harwich

      25 of 27 people found this useful

      Is this review useful?weird behaviour with USB C charger

  • Answers from the community

    • What is the output Amps for this product
      • Asked by Dhanasekar R from Ashburn
      • on 6 Aug 2019

      Answer

      This is a nuanced issue. To answer as directly as makes sense ...

      Charger A1719 should comply wit This is a nuanced issue. To answer as directly as makes sense ...

      Charger A1719 should comply with the USB PD 2.0 standard's power rules.

      It delivers up to (nominally):

      2.4A @ +5.2v DC
      3.0A @ +9v DC
      The charger does not list +15v
      4.3A @ +22.2v DC

      (3rd-party testing suggests it can somewhat exceed these nominals - check out the ChargerLab.com teardown/review).

      So: for a PD (see below) device, max current varies by voltage, by negotiation, to a max of about 4.3A. That's more than a standard USB C cable's rating (3A) - use the correct cable!

      BUT ...

      For a non-PD device, the above tells you little about achievable current or power:

      There are many standards for 2 devices to negotiate & transfer power over USB.
      PD (Power Delivery) is just the latest series of standards.
      It supports multi-voltage.* It has been through 3 versions; this charger talks the second of them.
      Earlier standards than PD were mostly 5v only.
      There were several proprietary fast-charge 'standards'.

      Don't expect this charger to speak any of those other fast-charge standards.
      This will only deliver voltage above 5v by PD negotiation.
      Don't expect to get high currents at 5v to benefit non-PD devices; it doesn't work like that; max current on 5v hasn't really gone up very much in several years, and probably never will. At 5v, it probably won't even yield 2.4A without negotiation (2A is the starting point for negotiation).

      So if the device under charge does support USB PD, max current is in the chart above. Cables should be specced to 5A for max delivery.
      If it doesn't support PD, realisable charge currents will be much lower; maybe 1.5A @ 5v (7.5W) for a USB BC 1.2 compliant device; 2 to 2.5A@5v (10-12W) for something more recent.

      * Recall: Power (W) = Potential (V) x Current (A).
      Higher powers require higher voltages; you can't just keep increasing current at 5v - you'll burn out the cables (87W@5v needs 18A!!!)

      • Answered by James H from London
      • on 23 Sep 2019
    • Answer

      USB-C Power Delivery fast charging requires protocol negotiation, which is not likely to be supporte USB-C Power Delivery fast charging requires protocol negotiation, which is not likely to be supported by a spllitter.

      • Answered by Jansen N from East Gwillimbury
      • on 9 Sep 2019