We believe that technology should be accessible to everyone.

The most powerful technology in the world is technology that everyone, including people with disabilities, can use. To work, create, communicate, stay in shape, and be entertained. So we don’t design products for some people or even most people. We design them for every single person.

Play the film

  • [music plays]
  • Camera pans slowly across a home kitchen, then cuts to a mirror. Sady, a woman with spastic cerebral palsy, is in the mirror’s reflection. Her hair is being brushed by her caretaker.
  • Cut to various shots of Sady being dressed by her caretaker.
  • (Sady — narrating with the help of electronic voice software)
  • People think that having a disability is a barrier.
  • [wheels rolling]
  • Close-up of her electric wheelchair wheels rolling over a threshold.
  • [buttons clicking]
  • Cut to Sady, working with an iMac at a desk in her home. She moves her head to operate switches on both sides of her wheelchair headrest, typing in Pages through Switch Control.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • But that’s not the way I see it.
  • Close-up of the iMac screen reveals her narration as it’s being typed.
  • Cut to a young man holding up his iPhone while making sign language gestures.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • You can catch up with friends.
  • The man is using FaceTime to have a sign language conversation with a woman.
  • She signs back while smiling.
  • Cut to a young man, a boy, and a woman in a park. The young man is taking a photo of the boy with iPhone.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • You can capture a moment with your family.
  • Since the young man is blind, he uses the VoiceOver feature to follow audible commands in the Camera app.
  • (iPhone)
  • One face. Small face. Focus lock.
  • [Camera app shutter sound]
  • Cut to a close-up of a woman’s hand holding an iPhone. She opens the Home app and taps the Good Morning button.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • And you can start the day bright and early.
  • The woman is lying in her bed. Her lamp turns on and the window shade rises automatically as a result of pressing the button. She moves from the bed to her wheelchair.
  • Cut to a doorway as a man exits, prepared to go on a hike with friends. He looks at his iPhone.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • You can take a trip to somewhere new.
  • Close-up of his ear reveals that he is wearing a hearing aid.
  • [wind blowing loudly]
  • Cut to a close-up of the man’s iPhone screen. He selects Outdoor in his hearing aid settings.
  • [wind blowing quietly]
  • (Woman)
  • Three miles to the summit.
  • He continues walking to catch up with his friends.
  • Cut to a young boy in a classroom, studying on an iPad while wearing headphones.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • You can concentrate on every word of a story.
  • Cut to a close-up of the boy’s iPad screen. “Home Before Dark” is the title of the chapter he’s reading. His iPad reads the first sentence aloud, highlighting each word as it is spoken.
  • (iPad)
  • A bird began to sing.
  • Cut to a close-up of the boy’s face as he reads and listens.
  • (iPad)
  • Jack opened his eyes.
  • Cut to a close-up of an Apple Watch on a woman’s wrist.
  • She taps Outdoor Wheelchair Run Pace in the Workout app, then taps Start.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • You can take the long way home.
  • The woman quickly propels her wheelchair down a paved bath beside the beach. Suddenly, she stops and begins moving backward, as if she were in a video being played in reverse.
  • [music swelling]
  • Camera zooms out to reveal that this is a video that Sady is editing in Final Cut Pro. All the previous scenes described above are quickly played in reverse as well.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • Or edit a film . . . like this one.
  • [buttons clicking]
  • Cut to a close-up of Sady, moving her head to operate switches on both sides of her wheelchair headrest, as she continues editing the film.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • When technology is designed for everyone . . .
  • [buttons clicking]
  • Cut to a close-up of Sandy’s iMac screen where she opens a directional controller and selects a downward motion. She moves the final clip into place — a shot of the woman in the wheelchair racing toward the sunset on the horizon.
  • (Sady narrating)
  • . . . it lets anyone do what they love . . . including me.
  • Cut to a close-up of Sady, smiling.
  • [click sound]
  • Cut to the Apple logo against a white background.

Workout App on Apple Watch Set a goal. Then push yourself past it.

Apple Watch now has fitness algorithms designed for wheelchair users. Instead of steps, the Workout and Activity apps track your pushes and keep you motivated.

Play the Workout app video

Replaythe Workout app video

Play the Workout app video

Replaythe Workout app video

Titles: Alanna Flax-Clark, Competitive Athlete

  • [outdoor sounds]
  • Camera pans to Alanna against a white background, sitting in her wheelchair.

She raises her Apple Watch and selects a workout titled “Outdoor Wheelchair Run Pace” in the Workout app.

  • She presses Start and begins pushing, exiting the frame to the left.
  • [wheels rolling]
  • Close-up of her face as she quickly propels herself forward.
  • [heavy breathing]
  • She races toward the camera and passes it.
  • [wheels rolling]
  • Close-ups of spinning spokes and her hands pushing the wheels.
  • [wheels rolling]
  • She gains speed across a white background and past trees.
  • [wheels rolling]
  • [wheels screeching]
  • She stops and raises her Apple Watch, swipes to stop her workout, and then slowly rolls away.
  • [wheels rolling]
  • [birds chirping]

Titles: Apple Watch with built-in wheelchair workouts

Scene fades to white.

Alanna Flax-Clark is a competitive athlete who cross-trains for equestrian events with the Activity app.

Switch Control on Mac If your mind can imagine it, your head can create it.

Switch Control lets you use switches, a joystick, or another adaptive device to control what’s on your screen.

Play the Switch Control video

Replaythe Switch Control video

Play the Switch Control video

Replaythe Switch Control video

Titles: Sady Paulson, Video Editor

  • [buttons clicking]
  • Camera pans to Sady, a woman with spastic cerebral palsy, working with an iMac at a desk.
  • [buttons clicking]
  • She moves her head to operate switches on both sides of her wheelchair headrest, navigating Final Cut Pro through Switch Control.
  • [buttons clicking]
  • In a close-up of the screen, she selects a thumbnail of a panoramic video clip of the San Francisco Bay, which she pans to reveal Fort Point and the Golden Gate Bridge.
  • [unintelligible audio playing at high speed]
  • A larger view of the video appears in a preview window on the upper right, which she scrubs through.
  • [buttons clicking]
  • She opens a directional controller on the screen, selects a downward motion, and places the clip of Fort Point in the timeline window.
  • [music plays]
  • The clip of waves lapping against Fort Point plays, and Sady smiles.

The camera pans away from Sady.

Titles: Mac with built-in Switch Control

The scene fades to white.

Sady Paulson is a video editor certified in Final Cut Pro who uses Switch Control to edit films on her Mac.

Live Listen on iPhone Hear every side of the story.

Live Listen lets you use your Made for iPhone hearing aids and iPhone to hear more clearly in loud places. Move your iPhone closer to the people who are speaking, and the built-in microphone will pick up what they’re saying.

Play the Live Listen video

Replaythe Live Listen video

Play the Live Listen video

Replaythe Live Listen video

Titles: Win Whittaker, Mountain Guide

The Camera pans to Win, sitting at a table with a friend in a noisy restaurant. He can’t hear her well; her voice sounds muffled.

  • (Woman – muffled)
  • So when Lynn came, we ended up going over to Reflection Lake. And then we decided to go up the mountain, and we didn’t go to Reflection Lake, but we decided we had time.

A close-up of his hearing aid.

A close-up of his iPhone showing his Made for iPhone hearing aid settings. He selects Start Live Listen, then slides his iPhone across the table so it’s closer to his friend. Her voice comes through clearly.

  • (Woman – clearly heard)
  • And we continued up towards the Bench Lakes.
  • (Win)
  • Bench Lakes?
  • (Woman)
  • Yes.
  • (Win)
  • Right. Are the wildflowers out now?
  • (Woman)
  • Oh my God, they are amazing! The Indian paintbrush, the colors.
  • [noisy restaurant]
  • The Camera pans away from Win and his friend.

Titles: iPhone with built-in Live Listen for Made for iPhone hearing aids

Scene fades to white.

Win Whittaker is a Mountain Guide who uses Live Listen and a Made for iPhone hearing aid to have conversations in noisy environments, whether it’s a coffee shop or a mountain summit.

VoiceOver on iPhone A picture can say a thousand words.

VoiceOver can describe what’s on your screen, even while you’re taking a photo.* And when you’re looking back at pictures, it can recognize things like facial expressions, scenes, and specific objects.

Play the VoiceOver video

Replaythe VoiceOver video

Play the VoiceOver video

Replaythe VoiceOver video

Titles: Mario Garcia, Photography Enthusiast

  • [birds chirping]
  • [children playing]
  • Camera pans to Mario and his family standing near a tree. He takes out his iPhone to photograph them.
  • (Mario)
  • Let’s take a picture.
  • (A family member)
  • Alright.

The man and woman pose. Mario holds up his iPhone to take the shot. Since he is blind, he uses the VoiceOver feature to follow audible commands in the Camera app.

  • (iPhone)
  • Camera. Landscape. Two faces.

Mario realizes that one family member is missing, so he asks his cousin to get in the frame.

  • (Mario)
  • Oh, hey, Isaac. Get in the picture!

Isaac enters the shot and appears in the viewfinder of the Camera app.

  • (iPhone)
  • Three faces.
  • (Mario)
  • You guys ready?
  • (A family member)
  • Yep.
  • (Mario)
  • Alright. Say cheese!
  • (Mario’s family)
  • Cheese!
  • [Camera app shutter noise]
  • Mario takes the photo and shows it to his family, who look pleased with the result.
  • (iPhone)
  • Three faces. Three smiling.
  • (A family member)
  • That’s good!

Camera pans away from Mario and his family.

Titles: iPhone with built-in VoiceOver

Scene fades to white.

Mario Garcia is a photography enthusiast who uses VoiceOver to take and share pictures of his family.

Speak Screen on iPad A reading experience can be a listening experience.

If it’s easier for you to read with an auditory element, Speak Screen can read text aloud from books, web pages, or homework assignments.

Klevian C. is a fourth-grade student who uses Speak Screen to enjoy books about adventure, magic, and dinosaurs.

Display Settings on Apple TV Figure out what to watch.
Not how to watch it.

You can customize Apple TV specifically for your vision. Choose from a range of color filters, hear audio descriptions of movies, or use Zoom to magnify menus and keyboards.

Explore all the accessibility features built into our products.